Our Mission

Our mission is to train the next generation of global leaders in digital health innovation

The Oxford Biodesign programme teaches the Biodesign Process – a systematic and proven approach to clinical needs finding and creatively inventing new biomedical technologies that take into account the important stakeholders of current healthcare settings, with a particular focus on digital health.

Oxford Biodesign offers 2 programmes, the 'Fellowship' programme and the 'Short' Programme.

For details of the Fellowship programme, please see the section 'Outline of Fellowship Training Programme'. We will be recruiting to this programme (maximum 6 posts) during April 2017 for a start date of late September 2017. The advert and job description are posted in the 'News' area of this website, but applications will need to be made via the University of Oxford website once the posts have gone live on the University website, at the beginning of April 2017.

The Oxford Biodesign Short programme is delivered by an interactive hands-on approach, to provide entrepreneurial participants with experience in the wide spectrum of skills needed as a medical innovator: analyzing important unmet medical needs by directly observing clinical practice, designing and IP protecting innovative solutions that address these needs, and translating the most promising concept into actual patient care. 

No matter if you envision a career in a medtech corporation or a start-up or you envision bringing your current research project into clinical practice, Oxford Biodesign will offer you a unique experience through first-hand interaction with different stakeholders and mentors in the medtech landscape (medical experts, IP lawyers, technology efficacy evaluators, venture capitalists…).

Oxford Biodesign is a joint initiative between the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The George Institute for Global Health (TGI) and the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford, in collaboration with Stanford Biodesign.

Broadly based on the successful Stanford University Biodesign program (with whom we are working), the Oxford Biodesign Short programme aims to provide a short introduction to the Biodesign Process – a systematic and proven approach to clinical needs finding and creatively inventing new biomedical technologies that take into account the important stakeholders of current healthcare settings.

Rather than providing a theoretical lecture series, the Oxford Biodesign short programme will be delivered by an interactive hands-on approach to provide participants with experience of the wide spectrum of skills needed as a medical innovator: from analyzing important unmet medical needs and designing and IP protecting innovative solutions that address these needs, to preparing how to bring solutions into patient care through the most appropriate implementation channels (start-up, corporate, or a licensing deal).

The particular focus of the Oxford Biodesign programme during the 2016-17 academic year is on digital health or connected health innovation. The emerging field of digital health offers a wide range of opportunities, from delivering healthcare outside a highly specialised hospital setting, to enabling consumers to become in charge of their own health through solutions for prevention rather than acute care, to creating integrated ways of care for chronic conditions and technology that supports the ageing population.

Digital health technologies offer the potential to transform healthcare by making it more responsive to consumers' needs, convenient for patients to access, and efficient and satisfying for providers to deliver. Yet there are significant barriers to the adoption of such technologies, including a lack of evidence of their impact on cost and outcomes and a lack of collaboration between clinicians and technologists in product development. In order to address this, we are proposing to establish the Centre for Digital Healthcare Innovation at Oxford University where we will both train the future leaders in inter-disciplinary research and innovation, as well as undertake specific research projects to contribute to questions of implementation and scale-up.

Ensuring that digital health technologies and solutions are safe, improve care, are cost-effective and address real needs is vital to their adoption in the real world. This will be a focus of one part of the research programme to be undertaken by the Centre and will generate evidence that is required to ensure the safety and efficacy of new technologies in healthcare. The other component of the research programme will concern itself with studying how to maximise the diffusion and uptake of new technologies into healthcare. This is an important question as we attempt to change work practices of doctors, nurses and other health professionals, as well as behaviours of millions of people.

The Oxford Biodesign Short programme will be recuiting again for the 2017-18 academic year during the autumn of 2017. Details of how to apply will be available on this website.

 

 

Programme

  1. Outline of Training Programme
  2. Identify
  3. Invent
  4. Incubate
  5. Short Programme
  6. Resources
  7. GaitThaw Project Wins Prize at the EIT Health UK-Ireland Competition

People

  1. Directors
  2. Fellows
  3. Steering Committee

Partners

  1. Contributors
  2. Supporters

BioEscalator

  1. About Oxford BioEscalator

News & Events

  1. Latest News
  2. Events & Workshops

Contact

Our Mission

Our mission is to train the next generation of global leaders in digital health innovation

The Oxford Biodesign programme teaches the Biodesign Process – a systematic and proven approach to clinical needs finding and creatively inventing new biomedical technologies that take into account the important stakeholders of current healthcare settings, with a particular focus on digital health.

Oxford Biodesign offers 2 programmes, the 'Fellowship' programme and the 'Short' Programme.

For details of the Fellowship programme, please see the section 'Outline of Fellowship Training Programme'. We will be recruiting to this programme (maximum 6 posts) during April 2017 for a start date of late September 2017. The advert and job description are posted in the 'News' area of this website, but applications will need to be made via the University of Oxford website once the posts have gone live on the University website, at the beginning of April 2017.

The Oxford Biodesign Short programme is delivered by an interactive hands-on approach, to provide entrepreneurial participants with experience in the wide spectrum of skills needed as a medical innovator: analyzing important unmet medical needs by directly observing clinical practice, designing and IP protecting innovative solutions that address these needs, and translating the most promising concept into actual patient care. 

No matter if you envision a career in a medtech corporation or a start-up or you envision bringing your current research project into clinical practice, Oxford Biodesign will offer you a unique experience through first-hand interaction with different stakeholders and mentors in the medtech landscape (medical experts, IP lawyers, technology efficacy evaluators, venture capitalists…).

Oxford Biodesign is a joint initiative between the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The George Institute for Global Health (TGI) and the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford, in collaboration with Stanford Biodesign.

Broadly based on the successful Stanford University Biodesign program (with whom we are working), the Oxford Biodesign Short programme aims to provide a short introduction to the Biodesign Process – a systematic and proven approach to clinical needs finding and creatively inventing new biomedical technologies that take into account the important stakeholders of current healthcare settings.

Rather than providing a theoretical lecture series, the Oxford Biodesign short programme will be delivered by an interactive hands-on approach to provide participants with experience of the wide spectrum of skills needed as a medical innovator: from analyzing important unmet medical needs and designing and IP protecting innovative solutions that address these needs, to preparing how to bring solutions into patient care through the most appropriate implementation channels (start-up, corporate, or a licensing deal).

The particular focus of the Oxford Biodesign programme during the 2016-17 academic year is on digital health or connected health innovation. The emerging field of digital health offers a wide range of opportunities, from delivering healthcare outside a highly specialised hospital setting, to enabling consumers to become in charge of their own health through solutions for prevention rather than acute care, to creating integrated ways of care for chronic conditions and technology that supports the ageing population.

Digital health technologies offer the potential to transform healthcare by making it more responsive to consumers' needs, convenient for patients to access, and efficient and satisfying for providers to deliver. Yet there are significant barriers to the adoption of such technologies, including a lack of evidence of their impact on cost and outcomes and a lack of collaboration between clinicians and technologists in product development. In order to address this, we are proposing to establish the Centre for Digital Healthcare Innovation at Oxford University where we will both train the future leaders in inter-disciplinary research and innovation, as well as undertake specific research projects to contribute to questions of implementation and scale-up.

Ensuring that digital health technologies and solutions are safe, improve care, are cost-effective and address real needs is vital to their adoption in the real world. This will be a focus of one part of the research programme to be undertaken by the Centre and will generate evidence that is required to ensure the safety and efficacy of new technologies in healthcare. The other component of the research programme will concern itself with studying how to maximise the diffusion and uptake of new technologies into healthcare. This is an important question as we attempt to change work practices of doctors, nurses and other health professionals, as well as behaviours of millions of people.

The Oxford Biodesign Short programme will be recuiting again for the 2017-18 academic year during the autumn of 2017. Details of how to apply will be available on this website.