Steering Committee
Professor Sir John Bell

Professor Bell went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar to train in medicine and undertook postgraduate training in London and at Stanford University. At Stanford he developed research interests in the area of immunology and genetics with a particular focus on characterising the molecular events associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. He returned to Oxford as a Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow in 1987 and was elected to the Nuffield Professorship of Clinical Medicine in Oxford in 1992. In 2002, he became the Regius Professor of Medicine.  He was appointed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in 2006 to Chair the Office for the Strategic Coordination of Health Research (OSCHR), the body responsible to co-ordinate the research functions of the NIHR and the MRC.  In 2008 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society and was made a Knight Bachelor for his services to Medical Science.  He was President of The Academy of Medical Sciences from 2006 to 2011.

Professor Bell has been extensively involved in the development of research programmes in genetics and genomics and in the development of a clinical research programme across the UK. He was the Founder of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and has led the significant expansion in biomedical research activities in the Clinical School in Oxford since 1992. His research programme has contributed to clearer understanding of genetic determinants of susceptibility in Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis and also of the molecular interactions on the surface of the T-lymphocyte associated with immune activation. He has helped to pioneer a large number of high-throughput genomic methodologies applied to biomedical science, including programmes in structural genomics, ENU mutagenesis and genetics.

Professor Bell sits on a wide range of advisory panels for public and private sector bodies responsible for biomedical research in Canada, Sweden, Denmark, France, Singapore and the UK. He sat on the Scientific Advisory Board for AstraZeneca from 1997 to 2000 and has sat on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Roche Palo Alto facility since 1998. He is a non-executive director of Roche AG (since 2001) and of Genentech (since 2009).  He is a member of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Scientific Advisory Committee.

He is a founding director of three biotechnology start up companies. Professor Bell has been a member of Oxford University Council and MRC Council; he is a Board Member of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration and UK Biobank and is Chairman of the Oxford Health Alliance, a private public partnership that sponsors research and advocacy on chronic disease globally. 

Professor Bell was elected a Fellow of the Academy in 1998.

Lord Paul Drayson

Paul Drayson trained as an engineer in the car industry before studying for a PhD in robotics, which sparked his interest in business and his lifelong career as a science entrepreneur.  He has developed successful businesses in food manufacturing, bioscience and motorsport R&D.

In 1986 he founded Lambourn Food Company, a business based on novel manufacturing technology that he developed successfully over seven years with venture capital backing. Following Lambourn’s acquisition, in 1993 he co-founded with his wife Elspeth the Oxford University spin-out company PowderJect Pharmaceuticals Plc.  He floated PowderJect on the London Stock Exchange in 1997 and over ten years as Chairman & Chief Executive he built PowderJect into one of the world’s leading vaccine companies with operations in the UK, USA and Scandinavia before its acquisition for £540m in 2003.

Paul co-founded Drayson Racing Technologies in 2007, a motorsport research and development business focused on environmentally sustainable technology that has achieved a number of firsts in the emerging field of e-racing, including pioneering wireless charging.

He has been interested in science and innovation policy since the 1990s and was appointed to the House of Lords in 2004. Lord Drayson was Science Entrepreneur in Residence at the Said Business School from 2003-2005. He served as a Defence Minister in the British government from May 2005 to November 2007 and from October 2008 to May 2010 he was Minister for Science and Innovation. He has been a member of the Privy Council since 2008 and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Professor Alison Noble

Professor Alison Noble OBE FREng is the Technikos Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Oxford University Department of Engineering Science, Associate Head of MPLS Division (Industry and Innovation), and a Fellow of St Hilda's College, Oxford. She is a former Director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering (2012-16).

Professor Noble is a Fellow of the IET, a Fellow of the MICCAI Society, and a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. She served as the President of the MICCAI Society, the international society in her field, from 2013-16, and Past-President for 2016-17. Professor Noble regularly serves on national strategic and policy making committees and grant awarding panels related to research and innovation in healthcare technologies and more broadly engineering, and is a member of the EPSRC Healthcare Technologies Strategic Advisory Team. Professor Noble is a Trustee of the Institute of Engineering Technology (IET) and of the Oxford Trust, which promotes enterprise as well as communication of SET to schools and the public, in the Oxfordshire region. She received an OBE for services to science and engineering in the Queen's Birthday Honours list in June 2013.

Professor Noble’s research interest is in biomedical image analysis, with a particular focus on raising the profile of ultrasound imaging as a first class data type by understanding the interplay of ultrasound device design (physics), clinical acquisition, and downstream image analysis and computer vision. Her most recent research has concerned applying machine learning to ultrasound to advance automatic 2D, 3D and video ultrasound analysis. Her research is motivated by unmet important clinical needs in developed world and developing world settings, and involves inter-disciplinary translational research collaborations with clinical groups from the UK and overseas. In 2016, she was the recipient of a 5-year ERC Advanced Grant entitled “Perception Ultrasound by Learning Sonographer Experience (PULSE)”, which aims to advance understanding of how to develop next generation ultrasound systems by utilizing machine learning.

A list of Professor Noble's recent publications can be found at the Publications webpages.

Professor Noble has combined academic research with innovation throughout her career. Her most recent venture is as a co-founder and CTO of Intelligent Ultrasound Ltd, spun-out from the her laboratory in 2012, which focuses on software solutions to make medical ultrasound a simpler and effective technology to use in existing and new areas of healthcare.

Professor Kazem Rahimi

Kazem Rahimi is the James Martin Senior Fellow in Essential Healthcare at the University of Oxford and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. As the Deputy Director of The George Institute UK he leads the Essential Healthcare Programme, which aims to find practical and affordable solutions for the global health priorities of the world’s largest emerging economies, as well as the priorities of vulnerable or disadvantaged populations in established economies.

He graduated in medicine from the University of Leipzig in Germany with postgraduate training in cardiology and health services research in Leipzig, London and Oxford. Prior to joining the George Institute, in 2010, he was a Research Fellow at Oxford’s Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiological Studies Unit. His research interests include service delivery innovation in chronic disease prevention and management, large-scale complex intervention studies, and data-driven electronic decision support systems.

Mr Gordon Saul

Gordon has over 20 years startup and business development experience in the medical device and pharmaceutical areas. Prior to joining Stanford’s Program in Biodesign, Gordon was an Executive-in-Residence at InterWest Partners, a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm. At InterWest, Gordon served as a founding or interim executive in over a dozen medical device and drug companies in the InterWest portfolio.

Prior to joining InterWest, he was a co-founder, board member and senior vice president of business development and marketing for PowderJect Pharmaceuticals, a publicly traded drug delivery company acquired by Chiron Corporation in 2003. Prior to PowderJect, he held business development roles at ALZA Corporation and Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, a division of Guidant Corp. He has also worked in Japan in the financial services industry and in management consulting for The Boston Consulting Group.

Gordon received an A.B. in engineering sciences from Dartmouth College and an M.B.A. from Stanford University.

Professor Lionel Tarassenko

Professor Lionel Tarassenko gained the degrees of BA in Engineering Science in 1978, and DPhil in Medical Electronics in 1985, both from the University of Oxford. He then held a number of positions in academia and industry, before taking up a University Lecturership in Oxford in 1988. Since then, he has devoted most of his research effort to the development of signal processing techniques and their application to diagnostic systems, especially in the context of medical problems.

He has been the holder of the Chair in Electrical Engineering at Oxford University since October 1997. He was elected to a Fellowship of the Institute of Electrical Engineers (IEE) in 1996, when he was also awarded the IEE Mather Premium for his work on neural networks, to a Fellowship of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2000 and to a Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2013. He received a British Computer Society Medal in 1996 for his work on neural network analysis of sleep disorders. His research on jet engine health monitoring was awarded the Rolls-Royce Chairman's Award for Technical Innovation in 2001 and the Sir Henry Royce High Value Patent Award in 2008. His work on mobile phones for healthcare was awarded the E-health 2005 Innovation Award for "best device to empower patients". He was awarded the 2006 Silver Medal of the Royal Academy of Engineering for his contribution to British engineering leading to market exploitation and he also won the Institute of Engineering & Technology IT Award in the same year.

Professor Tarassenko was a founder director of Third Phase (now part of Cmed) in December 1999, of Oxford BioSignals Ltd in May 2000, e-San Ltd (then t+ Medical) in February 2002, and of Oxehealth Ltd in September 2012. He is a director of Isis Innovation (the University's wholly-owned technology transfer company). He is a member of the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Sub-Panel for the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment, and he is the Chair of the Royal Academy of Engineering's Biomedical Engineering Panel. He is the Bioengineering theme leader for the joint NHS/University of Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, and the Director of the Centre of Excellence in Medical Engineering jointly funded by the Wellcome Trust and EPSRC since October 2009. He was the Director of the University's Institute of Biomedical Engineering from its opening in April 2008 until going on sabbatical leave in October 2012.

Professor Maarten De Vos

Maarten De Vosis Associate Professor at the IBME, in the University of Oxford, following an Junior Professorship at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. His academic work focuses on innovative biomedical monitoring and signal analysis, in particular the derivation of biosignatures of patient health from data acquired via wearable sensors and the incorporation of smart analytics into unobtrusive systems.

He has a strong interest in translational research and consults for different digital health and medical innovation companies. His pioneering research in the field of mobile real-life brain-monitoring led to the formation of mBrainTrain, where he is currently scientific advisor and which has won several prizes for their mobile EEG innovation. His work on neonatal brain monitoring also achieved impact in patient care through the Neoguard implementation project. After successful completion of the Biodesign faculty training at Stanford University, he started the Oxford Biodesign programme.

Dr James Wall

James is an Assistant Professor of Paediatric Surgery and Bioengineering, and is the Assistant Director of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship Program at Stanford University.  In addition to his medical training, James is an alumnus of the Stanford Biodesign program and holds a Masters degree in Bioengineering from Stanford University. He founded InSite Medical Technologies in 2007 to develop new approaches to regional anesthesia that resulted in a novel device for epidural access. His current research interest is in the design, development and analysis of medical technology as well as the emerging field of surgical endoscopy, and he currently leads the surgical endoscopy program at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

Professor Paul Yock

Paul Yock is the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Medicine and Mechanical Engineering (by courtesy) and Founding Co-Chair of Stanford’s new Department of Bioengineering.  He also holds a courtesy appointment on Operations, Information and Technology in the Stanford School of Business.

Dr. Yock is internationally known for his work in inventing, developing and testing new devices, including the Rapid Exchange ™ balloon angioplasty system, which is now the primary system in use worldwide.  He also invented a Doppler-guided access system known as the Smart Needle™ and PD-Access™.   The main focus of Dr. Yock’s research program has been in the field of intravascular ultrasound. He authored the fundamental patents for mechanical intravascular ultrasound imaging and helped conduct the initial clinical trials.  In 1986 he founded Cardiovascular Imaging Systems, which was acquired by Boston Scientific in 1994.  Dr. Yock has cofounded several other medical technology companies.

In his academic career Dr. Yock has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications, chapters and editorials, a textbook and over 45 US patents.  Recent awards include the Transcatheter Therapeutics (TCT) Career Achievement Award, the American College of Cardiology Distinguished Scientist Award and an honorary doctorate from Amherst College.  Dr. Yock is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Current research interests of Dr. Yock’s group at Stanford focus on development and testing of catheter-based delivery systems for cardiac cell transplantation and new catheter and molecular imaging techniques for cardiology.   Dr. Yock also founded and directs the Program in Biodesign, a unit of Stanford’s Bio-X initiative that focuses on invention and technology transfer related to biomedical engineering.

 

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Steering Committee

Professor Sir John Bell

Professor Bell went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar to train in medicine and undertook postgraduate training in London and at Stanford University. At Stanford he developed research interests in the area of immunology and genetics with a particular focus on characterising the molecular events associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. He returned to Oxford as a Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow in 1987 and was elected to the Nuffield Professorship of Clinical Medicine in Oxford in 1992. In 2002, he became the Regius Professor of Medicine.  He was appointed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in 2006 to Chair the Office for the Strategic Coordination of Health Research (OSCHR), the body responsible to co-ordinate the research functions of the NIHR and the MRC.  In 2008 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society and was made a Knight Bachelor for his services to Medical Science.  He was President of The Academy of Medical Sciences from 2006 to 2011.

Professor Bell has been extensively involved in the development of research programmes in genetics and genomics and in the development of a clinical research programme across the UK. He was the Founder of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and has led the significant expansion in biomedical research activities in the Clinical School in Oxford since 1992. His research programme has contributed to clearer understanding of genetic determinants of susceptibility in Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis and also of the molecular interactions on the surface of the T-lymphocyte associated with immune activation. He has helped to pioneer a large number of high-throughput genomic methodologies applied to biomedical science, including programmes in structural genomics, ENU mutagenesis and genetics.

Professor Bell sits on a wide range of advisory panels for public and private sector bodies responsible for biomedical research in Canada, Sweden, Denmark, France, Singapore and the UK. He sat on the Scientific Advisory Board for AstraZeneca from 1997 to 2000 and has sat on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Roche Palo Alto facility since 1998. He is a non-executive director of Roche AG (since 2001) and of Genentech (since 2009).  He is a member of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Scientific Advisory Committee.

He is a founding director of three biotechnology start up companies. Professor Bell has been a member of Oxford University Council and MRC Council; he is a Board Member of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration and UK Biobank and is Chairman of the Oxford Health Alliance, a private public partnership that sponsors research and advocacy on chronic disease globally. 

Professor Bell was elected a Fellow of the Academy in 1998.

Lord Paul Drayson

Paul Drayson trained as an engineer in the car industry before studying for a PhD in robotics, which sparked his interest in business and his lifelong career as a science entrepreneur.  He has developed successful businesses in food manufacturing, bioscience and motorsport R&D.

In 1986 he founded Lambourn Food Company, a business based on novel manufacturing technology that he developed successfully over seven years with venture capital backing. Following Lambourn’s acquisition, in 1993 he co-founded with his wife Elspeth the Oxford University spin-out company PowderJect Pharmaceuticals Plc.  He floated PowderJect on the London Stock Exchange in 1997 and over ten years as Chairman & Chief Executive he built PowderJect into one of the world’s leading vaccine companies with operations in the UK, USA and Scandinavia before its acquisition for £540m in 2003.

Paul co-founded Drayson Racing Technologies in 2007, a motorsport research and development business focused on environmentally sustainable technology that has achieved a number of firsts in the emerging field of e-racing, including pioneering wireless charging.

He has been interested in science and innovation policy since the 1990s and was appointed to the House of Lords in 2004. Lord Drayson was Science Entrepreneur in Residence at the Said Business School from 2003-2005. He served as a Defence Minister in the British government from May 2005 to November 2007 and from October 2008 to May 2010 he was Minister for Science and Innovation. He has been a member of the Privy Council since 2008 and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Professor Alison Noble

Professor Alison Noble OBE FREng is the Technikos Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Oxford University Department of Engineering Science, Associate Head of MPLS Division (Industry and Innovation), and a Fellow of St Hilda's College, Oxford. She is a former Director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering (2012-16).

Professor Noble is a Fellow of the IET, a Fellow of the MICCAI Society, and a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. She served as the President of the MICCAI Society, the international society in her field, from 2013-16, and Past-President for 2016-17. Professor Noble regularly serves on national strategic and policy making committees and grant awarding panels related to research and innovation in healthcare technologies and more broadly engineering, and is a member of the EPSRC Healthcare Technologies Strategic Advisory Team. Professor Noble is a Trustee of the Institute of Engineering Technology (IET) and of the Oxford Trust, which promotes enterprise as well as communication of SET to schools and the public, in the Oxfordshire region. She received an OBE for services to science and engineering in the Queen's Birthday Honours list in June 2013.

Professor Noble’s research interest is in biomedical image analysis, with a particular focus on raising the profile of ultrasound imaging as a first class data type by understanding the interplay of ultrasound device design (physics), clinical acquisition, and downstream image analysis and computer vision. Her most recent research has concerned applying machine learning to ultrasound to advance automatic 2D, 3D and video ultrasound analysis. Her research is motivated by unmet important clinical needs in developed world and developing world settings, and involves inter-disciplinary translational research collaborations with clinical groups from the UK and overseas. In 2016, she was the recipient of a 5-year ERC Advanced Grant entitled “Perception Ultrasound by Learning Sonographer Experience (PULSE)”, which aims to advance understanding of how to develop next generation ultrasound systems by utilizing machine learning.

A list of Professor Noble's recent publications can be found at the Publications webpages.

Professor Noble has combined academic research with innovation throughout her career. Her most recent venture is as a co-founder and CTO of Intelligent Ultrasound Ltd, spun-out from the her laboratory in 2012, which focuses on software solutions to make medical ultrasound a simpler and effective technology to use in existing and new areas of healthcare.

Professor Kazem Rahimi

Kazem Rahimi is the James Martin Senior Fellow in Essential Healthcare at the University of Oxford and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. As the Deputy Director of The George Institute UK he leads the Essential Healthcare Programme, which aims to find practical and affordable solutions for the global health priorities of the world’s largest emerging economies, as well as the priorities of vulnerable or disadvantaged populations in established economies.

He graduated in medicine from the University of Leipzig in Germany with postgraduate training in cardiology and health services research in Leipzig, London and Oxford. Prior to joining the George Institute, in 2010, he was a Research Fellow at Oxford’s Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiological Studies Unit. His research interests include service delivery innovation in chronic disease prevention and management, large-scale complex intervention studies, and data-driven electronic decision support systems.

Mr Gordon Saul

Gordon has over 20 years startup and business development experience in the medical device and pharmaceutical areas. Prior to joining Stanford’s Program in Biodesign, Gordon was an Executive-in-Residence at InterWest Partners, a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm. At InterWest, Gordon served as a founding or interim executive in over a dozen medical device and drug companies in the InterWest portfolio.

Prior to joining InterWest, he was a co-founder, board member and senior vice president of business development and marketing for PowderJect Pharmaceuticals, a publicly traded drug delivery company acquired by Chiron Corporation in 2003. Prior to PowderJect, he held business development roles at ALZA Corporation and Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, a division of Guidant Corp. He has also worked in Japan in the financial services industry and in management consulting for The Boston Consulting Group.

Gordon received an A.B. in engineering sciences from Dartmouth College and an M.B.A. from Stanford University.

Professor Lionel Tarassenko

Professor Lionel Tarassenko gained the degrees of BA in Engineering Science in 1978, and DPhil in Medical Electronics in 1985, both from the University of Oxford. He then held a number of positions in academia and industry, before taking up a University Lecturership in Oxford in 1988. Since then, he has devoted most of his research effort to the development of signal processing techniques and their application to diagnostic systems, especially in the context of medical problems.

He has been the holder of the Chair in Electrical Engineering at Oxford University since October 1997. He was elected to a Fellowship of the Institute of Electrical Engineers (IEE) in 1996, when he was also awarded the IEE Mather Premium for his work on neural networks, to a Fellowship of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2000 and to a Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2013. He received a British Computer Society Medal in 1996 for his work on neural network analysis of sleep disorders. His research on jet engine health monitoring was awarded the Rolls-Royce Chairman's Award for Technical Innovation in 2001 and the Sir Henry Royce High Value Patent Award in 2008. His work on mobile phones for healthcare was awarded the E-health 2005 Innovation Award for "best device to empower patients". He was awarded the 2006 Silver Medal of the Royal Academy of Engineering for his contribution to British engineering leading to market exploitation and he also won the Institute of Engineering & Technology IT Award in the same year.

Professor Tarassenko was a founder director of Third Phase (now part of Cmed) in December 1999, of Oxford BioSignals Ltd in May 2000, e-San Ltd (then t+ Medical) in February 2002, and of Oxehealth Ltd in September 2012. He is a director of Isis Innovation (the University's wholly-owned technology transfer company). He is a member of the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Sub-Panel for the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment, and he is the Chair of the Royal Academy of Engineering's Biomedical Engineering Panel. He is the Bioengineering theme leader for the joint NHS/University of Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, and the Director of the Centre of Excellence in Medical Engineering jointly funded by the Wellcome Trust and EPSRC since October 2009. He was the Director of the University's Institute of Biomedical Engineering from its opening in April 2008 until going on sabbatical leave in October 2012.

Professor Maarten De Vos

Maarten De Vosis Associate Professor at the IBME, in the University of Oxford, following an Junior Professorship at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. His academic work focuses on innovative biomedical monitoring and signal analysis, in particular the derivation of biosignatures of patient health from data acquired via wearable sensors and the incorporation of smart analytics into unobtrusive systems.

He has a strong interest in translational research and consults for different digital health and medical innovation companies. His pioneering research in the field of mobile real-life brain-monitoring led to the formation of mBrainTrain, where he is currently scientific advisor and which has won several prizes for their mobile EEG innovation. His work on neonatal brain monitoring also achieved impact in patient care through the Neoguard implementation project. After successful completion of the Biodesign faculty training at Stanford University, he started the Oxford Biodesign programme.

Dr James Wall

James is an Assistant Professor of Paediatric Surgery and Bioengineering, and is the Assistant Director of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship Program at Stanford University.  In addition to his medical training, James is an alumnus of the Stanford Biodesign program and holds a Masters degree in Bioengineering from Stanford University. He founded InSite Medical Technologies in 2007 to develop new approaches to regional anesthesia that resulted in a novel device for epidural access. His current research interest is in the design, development and analysis of medical technology as well as the emerging field of surgical endoscopy, and he currently leads the surgical endoscopy program at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

Professor Paul Yock

Paul Yock is the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Medicine and Mechanical Engineering (by courtesy) and Founding Co-Chair of Stanford’s new Department of Bioengineering.  He also holds a courtesy appointment on Operations, Information and Technology in the Stanford School of Business.

Dr. Yock is internationally known for his work in inventing, developing and testing new devices, including the Rapid Exchange ™ balloon angioplasty system, which is now the primary system in use worldwide.  He also invented a Doppler-guided access system known as the Smart Needle™ and PD-Access™.   The main focus of Dr. Yock’s research program has been in the field of intravascular ultrasound. He authored the fundamental patents for mechanical intravascular ultrasound imaging and helped conduct the initial clinical trials.  In 1986 he founded Cardiovascular Imaging Systems, which was acquired by Boston Scientific in 1994.  Dr. Yock has cofounded several other medical technology companies.

In his academic career Dr. Yock has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications, chapters and editorials, a textbook and over 45 US patents.  Recent awards include the Transcatheter Therapeutics (TCT) Career Achievement Award, the American College of Cardiology Distinguished Scientist Award and an honorary doctorate from Amherst College.  Dr. Yock is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Current research interests of Dr. Yock’s group at Stanford focus on development and testing of catheter-based delivery systems for cardiac cell transplantation and new catheter and molecular imaging techniques for cardiology.   Dr. Yock also founded and directs the Program in Biodesign, a unit of Stanford’s Bio-X initiative that focuses on invention and technology transfer related to biomedical engineering.